Terry Pratchett

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(April 28, 1948 – March 12, 2015)

Sir Terence David John Pratchett, OBE, was an English author of fantasy novels, especially humorous works, best known for his Discworld series of 41 comic novels.

He developed an interest in science fiction as a young man and attended conventions from about 1963, but gafiated when he got his first job as a trainee journalist in ’65.

Pratchett's first published short story, "Business Rivals," appeared in the High Wycombe Technical School magazine in 1962. His first novel, The Carpet People, was published in 1971. His Discworld books began with The Colour of Magic in 1983. They were a phenomenal success, and generated many spinoffs like maps, games, diaries, quizbooks and even academic studies.

Despite having learned to cope with vast UK signing sessions that went on until his wrist screamed for mercy, Terry remained cheerful and approachable, with a fund of wry anecdotes about his various lives as famous writer, obscure writer, journalist, and (once upon a time) PR man for a nuclear power station, until his death.

Pratchett married Lyn Purves at the Congregational Church, Gerrards Cross, on 5 October 1968. Their daughter, Rhianna Pratchett, also a writer, was born in 1976. She now promotes her father’s legacy.

In December 2007, Pratchett announced that he had been diagnosed with a rare form of early-onset Alzheimer's disease, which would lead to his death.

You have to admire the man who created the bibliophile orangutan of Unseen University, literature's first rugged, muscular and caring role-model for librarians everywhere.

Entry in the Science Fiction Encyclopedia

Awards, Honors and GoHships:

Official website


Person Website(IA) Reasonator 19482015
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