Fanac

See also: Crifanac, Hyperfanac, actifan.

(1) What Fans Do

Short for fan activity, which includes writing in fanzines or on fandom-related websites, corresponding with other fans and participating in apas, sf club meetings or conventions.

Some fans claim that there are three types of fans: club fans, fanzine fans, and con fans — and that Fanac (like Gaul) is therefore divided into three parts. Zealous FIAWOLists claim that daily life interaction with other fans also constitutes a form of fanac, giving rise to the saying "Anything two fans do together is fanac."

In Larry Niven's "Fourth Profession," the hero, who'd taken a language pill, started to define fanac as "putting out a zine, writing to the lettercol, helping put on a con…" and then was interrupted. FANCY II defined it as "devoting time, energy, and money to non-profit pursuits in the general field of fantasy and fandom. This includes reading, collecting, corresponding, belonging to organizations, writing, publishing, recruiting new fans, visiting fellow stfnists, perhaps living with them in a science fiction house, and attending fan gatherings."

Mundane life can get in the way of fanac: see FAFIA. And after a while the fascination of fanac tends to wear a little thin — one reason long-time fans are sometimes termed Old and Tired. In an extreme case, this can lead to the fan becoming burned out.

(2) A Club

FANAC is the organization which sponsored Magicon, and currently sponsors the fanac.org fanhistory website, and Fancyclopedia 3, itself! FANAC is a Florida non-profit and 501(c)3 corporation, and, with only a bit of a struggle, the name stands for Florida Association for Nucleation And Conventions.

(3) A Wand

The name of the second magic wand the Spirit of Fandom touches Jophan with so as to show him fandom's inner essence (the first was called 'Contact') in The Enchanted Duplicator.

(4) A Fanzine by Terry Carr and Ron Ellik

Fanac was a news-and-chatterzine published in Berkeley by Terry Carr and Ron Ellik, begun in 1958, in the midst of (true) Seventh Fandom. Its activity promoted the 1958 Worldcon (SoLaCon), and gave wide circulation to the series of pro and fan deaths in 1958, on which it bestowed the title of The Year of the Jackpot (in reference to the Heinlein story of that title).

It started as a weekly, but moved to biweekly, with issues typically being four pages. (The February 1960 issue was an exception. It was a second anniversary issue, titled Fannish II and ran over forty pages, including a thirty-page section summarizing the 1959 Fanac Poll and an index to Fanac's first two years. The cover of this issue was a photo of a local fan, Trina Castillo, dressed in only a propeller beanie and a copy of Fancyclopedia II.) Hobgoblin was a fanzine-review supplement to it.

Besides news, it had features such as Walt Willis's column P*L*I*N*T*H, about happenings in Irish Fandom. Some of the early issues were paied with issues of Dave Rike's RUR. It won the 1959 Best Fanzine Hugo.

In September 1960 Ron Ellik quit as co-editor and was replaced by Miriam Carr. In 1961, the Carrs let it lapse into hiatus and it was revived by Walter Breen, but he was unable to keep to the schedule or maintain the quality (the typography and printing both suffered markedly).

Scans of a complete run of FANAC can be found at http://fanac.org/fanzines/FANAC/

Issue Date Pages Notes
1 February 24, 1958 4
2 March 4, 1958 2
3 March 10, 1958 4
4 March 17, 1958 4
5 March 24, 1958 4
6 March 31, 1958 4
7 April 8, 1958 6
8 April 14, 1958 4
9 April 22, 1958 4
10 April 29, 1958 6
11 May 5, 1958 4
12 May 12, 1958 6
13 May 19, 1958 4
14 May 26, 1958 6
15 June 2, 1958 6
16 June 9, 1958 6
17 June 17, 1958 6
18 June 23, 1958 6
19 July 4, 1958 4
20 July 12, 1958 4
21 July 26, 1958 4
22 August 1, 1958 4
23 August 1958 4
24 September 8, 1958 4
25 September 26, 1958 4
26 October 3, 1958 6
27 October 18, 1958 8
28 October 28, 1958 4
29 November 16, 1958 10
30 December 5, 1958 8
31 December 18, 1958 6
32 January 18, 1959 4
33 February 14, 1959 6
34 February 24, 1959 30 The Fannish; Includes the results of the Fanac Poll
35 March 18, 1959 4
36 April 4, 1959 4
37 April 21, 1959 6
38 May 5, 1959 4 1/4
39 May 22, 1959 4
40 June 9, 1959 6
41 July 22, 1959 6
42 August 18, 1959 6
43 September 30, 1959 6
44 October 14, 1959 4
45 October 28, 1959 4
46 November 11, 1959 4
47 November 26, 1959 4
48 December 9, 1959 4
49 December 29, 1959 4
50 January 7, 1960 4
51 January 15, 1960 4 rider: Hobgoblin #4
52 February 17, 1960 4
53 February 24, 1960 46 Fannish #2: Includes index and Fanac Poll results
54 March 22, 1960 4 Issue is dittoed (in 3 colors!)
55 March 29, 1960 2 ditto
55 April 1, 1960 4 April 1 issue
56 April 19, 1960 4 rider: An Egoboo a Day From All Over 1
57 May 1, 1960 4
58 May 16, 1960 4 Miriam Carr added as circulation manager
59 May 27, 1960 4 rider: Hobgoblin #6
60 June 8, 1960 4
61 June 1960 6
62 July 16, 1960 4
63 August 22, 1960 4
64 September 4, 1960 2
65 September 30, 1960 8 Final issue edited by Ron Ellik
66 November 14, 1960 6 Editors are now Terry & Miriam Carr
67 November 30, 1960 4
68 December 19, 1960 4
69 December 31`, 1960 4 Includes 1960 Fanac Poll ballot
70 January 15, 1961 6
71 January 28, 1961 6 Final issue edited by Terry & Miriam Carr
72 April 18, 1961 12 Now edited by Walter Breen
73 May 6, 1961 6
74 May 23, 1961 8
75 June 14, 1961 14
76 June 30, 1961 6 Published from NYC
77 July 30, 1961 12 Published from NYC
78 September 9, 1961 8 rider: Admirable Crycon
79 October 6, 1961 16
80 October 24, 1961 8
81 November 16, 1961 6
82 November 28, 1961 10 rider: An Egoboo a Day from All Over #2
83 January 1962 8
84 January 25, 1962 10
85 February 7, 1962 14
86 Spring 1962 8 rider: An Egoboo a Day from All Over #3; Published from NYC
87 July 1962 6
88 September 10, 1962 8
89 November 20, 1962 6
90
91 January 1963 6
92 February 1963 4
93 April 1962 6
94 October 1963 4 Aka The Insurgent Issue
95 Autumn 1963 6
96 November 1963 18
97 November 30, 1963
98
99
100 February 1964 1
Fannish III April 1964 28 Mostly stenciled in 1961 by Terry Carr and published in 1964 by Bruce Pelz

(5) Hoax Fanac by Ellik and Carr

Carr and Ellik, the editors of the real Fanac also did three hoax issues:

Issue Date Pages Notes
55 April 1960 4 A fake April Fools issue, possibly by Les Gerber and Andrew Reiss
103 1982 2
XX April 1962 2 Done at the 1962 Eastercon and attached to Skyrack #42

(6) Hoax Fanac by Demmon and White

Ted White and Calvin Demmon published two hoax issues of Fanac which were call the "Insurgent Edition."

Issue Date Pages Notes
94 October 1963 4 It was a rider to Minac
96 November 1963 2 It was bound with Ego 5, 6 & 7 and with Minac 9 & 10

(7) A Fanzine by John-Henri Holmberg

John-Henri Holmberg published the Swedish newszine Fanac, which was modeled and named after Carr and Ellik Fanac beginning in late 1963. This was near the end of the run of SF-Times which helped to maintain source of news for Swedish fans throughout the decade. Holmberg used the pseudonym Carl Brandon, Jr. in early issues, after the hoax fan invented by Fanac co-editor Terry Carr (and others) in the mid 50s. As Holmberg later remembered, "I wasn't particularly inspired by Willis or Irish Fandom, but instead was totally fascinated by the fannish Berkeley and later New York group, including Terry Carr, Ted White, Ron Ellik, Dave Rike, Boob Stewart, and Carl Brandon, Sr."

Holmberg's Fanac lasted until 1982, a total of 117 issues. He re-launched it in mid-1990s, but it went dormant after only two issues

(8) A Board Game

A board game, FANAC!, designed by David Grigg.

(9) The Fancyclopedia 2 Definition

from Fancyclopedia 2 ca. 1959
Fan activity. Devoting time, energy, and money to non-profit pursuits in the general field of fantasy and fandom. This includes reading, collecting, corresponding, belonging to organizations, writing, publishing, recruiting new fans, visiting fellow stfnists, perhaps living with them in a science-fiction house, and attending fan gatherings.

Most fen pass thru a certain cycle of activeness; after getting familiar with the field they start taking on projects left and right, not realizing that they're building up to a peak that they haven't time to maintain. Suddenly they announce that they must drop all fanac (except subbing to a couple of fanzines and writing a couple of correspondents) because activities in the mundane world are demanding most of their time and energy. Some disappear from fandom at this point, but many others discover after a while that they still need the intellectual companionship and means of self-expression in fandom and can find time to take on a little more activity, and so at length find a fairly constant level that they can keep up, barring catastrophes like getting married or drafted. (Not that there aren't quite a number of GIs and husbands keeping up a fair degree of activity.)

Oh, and also we note here Fanac: a news-and-chatter 'zine published by Terry Carr and Ron Ellik, begun 1958. It was part of the trend mentioned in the second sentence under, and, indeed, a noble example of it. But due to its activity the news of the series of deaths in fandom in 1958 got that wide circulation and general impact that gave the Year of the Jackpot its name.