Difference between revisions of "Fringe Fandom"

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An old-fashioned term, '''''fringe fandom''''' refers to any specialized '''subfandom''', such as those devoted to television shows, [[gamers|gaming]], [[anime]] or [[comics]], originally subfamdoms which branched from the original [[sf fandom]] that started in the 1930s in the [[lettercol]] of [[Hugo Gernsback]]'s [[Amazing Stories]] and the [[Science Fiction League]]. It is also sometimes used for less related but overlapping groups such as the [[Society for Creative Anachronism]] and [[mystery fandom]], as well as specialized literary groups like the [[Mythopoeic Society]].  
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An old-fashioned term, '''''fringe fandom''''' refers to any specialized '''subfandom''', such as those devoted to television shows, [[gamers|gaming]], [[anime]] or [[comics]], originally subfamdoms which branched from the original [[sf fandom]] that started in the 1930s in the [[lettercol]] of [[Hugo Gernsback]]'s [[Amazing Stories]] and the [[Science Fiction League]]. It is also sometimes used for less related but overlapping groups such as the [[Society for Creative Anachronism]] and mystery fandom, as well as specialized literary groups like the [[Mythopoeic Society]].  
  
The term dates to the 1960s or '70s, when those groups first branched off to hold specialized [[conventions]], and has fallen into disuse, in part because those fandoms now far outnumber the group that concentrates on written [[sf]], [[SF fanzines]], [[Worldcons]] and old-time [[clubs]], and tend to resent the implication that there is [[Trufandom]] that excludes them. We are all supposed to be together under one [[big tent]], which, however, squeezes out [[fanhistory]] and other interests of old-style [[fen]].
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The term dates to the 1960s or '70s, when those groups first branched off to hold specialized [[conventions]], and has fallen into disuse, in part because those fandoms now far outnumber the group that concentrates on [[literary]] [[sf]], [[SF fanzines]], [[Worldcons]] and old-time [[clubs]], and tend to resent the implication that there is [[Trufandom]] that excludes them. We are all supposed to be together under one [[big tent]], which, however, squeezes out [[fanhistory]], [[fanzines]] and other interests of old-style [[fen]].
  
 
Controversy erupted after the rise of [[Trekkers|Star Trek fandom]] and [[comics]] fandom. Although they had established their own [[convention]]s and institutions, when their increasing numbers threatened to overwhelm [[Worldcon]], and the [[concom]] of [[MidAmeriCon]] in 1976 announced that there would be no programming related to those topics at the [[con]], there was a huge uproar.
 
Controversy erupted after the rise of [[Trekkers|Star Trek fandom]] and [[comics]] fandom. Although they had established their own [[convention]]s and institutions, when their increasing numbers threatened to overwhelm [[Worldcon]], and the [[concom]] of [[MidAmeriCon]] in 1976 announced that there would be no programming related to those topics at the [[con]], there was a huge uproar.
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See also: [[Fringe Fan]], which can, but doesn’t necessarily mean a member of a fringe fandom.
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Latest revision as of 11:05, 2 December 2020

An old-fashioned term, fringe fandom refers to any specialized subfandom, such as those devoted to television shows, gaming, anime or comics, originally subfamdoms which branched from the original sf fandom that started in the 1930s in the lettercol of Hugo Gernsback's Amazing Stories and the Science Fiction League. It is also sometimes used for less related but overlapping groups such as the Society for Creative Anachronism and mystery fandom, as well as specialized literary groups like the Mythopoeic Society.

The term dates to the 1960s or '70s, when those groups first branched off to hold specialized conventions, and has fallen into disuse, in part because those fandoms now far outnumber the group that concentrates on literary sf, SF fanzines, Worldcons and old-time clubs, and tend to resent the implication that there is Trufandom that excludes them. We are all supposed to be together under one big tent, which, however, squeezes out fanhistory, fanzines and other interests of old-style fen.

Controversy erupted after the rise of Star Trek fandom and comics fandom. Although they had established their own conventions and institutions, when their increasing numbers threatened to overwhelm Worldcon, and the concom of MidAmeriCon in 1976 announced that there would be no programming related to those topics at the con, there was a huge uproar.

See also: Fringe Fan, which can, but doesn’t necessarily mean a member of a fringe fandom.



Fanspeak
This is a fanspeak page. Please extend it by adding information about when and by whom it was coined, whether it’s still in use, etc.