MFS

The Minneapolis Fantasy Society formed when Clifford Simak arrived in Minneapolis and joined with remnants of the old Minneapolis SFL. The first meeting of the MFS was in 1937, but they did not meet again for three years. The second meeting was in November 29, 1940 at Clifford Simak's house and Simak was elected to be the first director with Oliver Saari as assistant. This time the group caught on and it met biweekly.

During the War, members such as Phil Bronson published Scienti-Comics, and Morris Scott Dollens published The Fantasite. Other members included Redd Boggs, Gordon R. Dickson, Manse Brackney, Sam Russell. At its peak, there were nineteen members.

As members went off to the War, the club slowly disorganized and became much less formal. (There was a temporary suspension of the group on May 8, 1942.) By 1944, even informal meetings were rare and the group disbanded in 1944.

In 1946, after the War, the group reformed as Tomorrow, Inc., but by 1947 it was again the Minneapolis Fantasy Society. Poul Anderson and Rich Elsberry joined during this period.

On Labor Day, 1948, there was a conference at Oliver Saari's house attended by sixteen local fans. Sometime in the early 50s it finally disbanded as a formal organization, but continued for decades as an informal group of friends.

With the demise of the MFS as an organization, a fannish void was created in Minneapolis lasting from the mid 50s to the foundation of Minn-Stf in the late 60s. Ruth Berman and some friends tried to start the Twin Cities Fantasy Society in the late 50s, but could not generate enough interest to keep it going for very long.

Members included: Poul Anderson, Redd Boggs, Manse Brackney Phil Bronson, Theodore Cogswell, Gordon R. Dickson, Morris Scott Dollens, Rich Elsberry, John L. Gergen, Kenny Gray, Carl Jacobi, Noel Loomis, Dale Rostomily, Sam Russell, Oliver Saari, and Clifford D. Simak.

from Fancyclopedia 2 ca. 1959
The Minneapolis Fantasy Society. It seems to have been existent and producing Silly Stories back in 1938, but came into action in fandom only around 1942. They plugged for the convention after the Pacificon, and later for a centrally located con instead of the postponed Pacificon, but before the war had gone far for the USA began losing members to the armed forces and to Shangri-LA. Members often retained the MFS tag in addition to that of any new local they joined. MFS fans included Phil Bronson, Oliver Saari, Morrie Dollens, John Gergen, Samuel D Russell, and Manson Brackney. They were altogether lovely, but slightly whacky.

The club, which had died of absences in 1943, was revived in December 1946 by Cliff Simak and John Chapman, under the name of Tomorrow Incorporated; by 27 December 1947 another revival (under the old MFS name) was necessary. Dale Rostomily, Phil Bronson, Gergen, Simak, Carl Jacobi, Poul Anderson, Noel Loomis, Redd Boggs, Kenny Gray and Rich Elsberry were initiates. They specialized in heavy discussions and fangabbing; most had broadened interests beyond SF, which was the club's downfall. It ceased activities in the early 50s tho never officially dissolved.
from Fancyclopedia 1 ca. 1944
The Minneapolis Fantasy Society. It seems to have been existent and producing silly stories back in 1938, but came into action in fandom only around 1943. They plugged for the convention after the Pacificon, and later for a centrally located gathering instead of the postponed Pacificon, but before the war had gone far, began losing members to the armed forces and to Shangri-LA. As is usual, however, members retained the MFS tag in addition to any new local they joined. Members included Bronson, Saari, Dollens, Gergen, Russell, and Brackney. They are altogether lovely, but slitely wacky.