Golden Gate Futurians

A club (not to be confused with the NYC Futurians) in the Bay Area also known as the Golden Gate Futurian Society and the GGFS. It was formed in 1941. For a time in the late 50s it was called the Golden Gate Leprechauns (presumably a reference to the contemporary Little Men's) and even more briefly (ending in February 1960) as the Golden Gate Trolls.

In the early 60s it was still active — it bid for and ran Baycon (Westercon), the 1961 Westercon — but by the mid-60s it was only meeting sporadically. In March 1969 there was a last effort to revive the group. The meeting was attended by about ten people and featured a sercon discussion of sf, but soon degenerated into games of Risk and Diplomacy.

Later members included Karen Anderson.

from Fancyclopedia 2 ca. 1959
See BAY AREA.

from Fancyclopedia 2 Supplement ca. 1960:
A fan club dying and reviving, at irregular intervals, since the early '40s, in the San Francisco area. Its last incarnation "all started one day when Terry (Carr), Boob (Stewart), myself (Dave Rike), and maybe Pete (Graham) went over to a fringe-fan's place. He had a taper and since his parents owned a store, unlimited supplies of beer. We spent an afternoon of drinking-drinking-drinking and taping. Copies of fanzines we brot along and various fannish classics were dramatized…At the next GGFS meeting, the tape was played and we all thot it was the most. This started the tradition of having a beer bust after, before, or on off-nights, or at any time, and calling them GGFS meetings. One Roy Seiler was voted President because he was 21 and could, therefore, be purchasing agent for potables. The only GGFS oneshot was Sic which was put together at two meetings and after that the club was no more. Enough of us had turned 21 by that time and/or had friends who had, that there was no reason to continue meeting. The ol' GGFS was a club with a purpose, is one thing you can say."
from Fancyclopedia 1 ca. 1944
San Francisco-Oakland local, and core of Starlight Publications. They plugged hard for the 1942 convention, even had a formal invitation from the mayor, but failed. With the real retirement (maybe) of Joe Fortier, they ceased to be much heard, but turned out in fairish number for the Staplecon.