Fans Outside Angloparlantia
from Fancyclopedia 2 ca. 1959
impinge only marginally on us, tho the exchange with our fellow stficionados in Spanish America, France, Germany, and Scandinavia adds that je ne sais quoi to fannish life. Before the end of World War II all known stfnists lived in America or the British Empire, except for Gallic Georges Gallet, Deutschlander Herbert Hausler, and Hungarian Andrew Lennard. But after the war a tremendous increase in the popularity of science-fiction in other countries must have occurred; concerning the details your Plutarch has been unable to make any determinations. The International SF Society, Erwin Scudla in charge, claims 3000 members and branches in practically every nation of Western Europe. Some of its affiliates are the SF Club de Paris, Club Futopia, SF Club Europa, Transgalaxis, Cosmos Club, and Clube de Literatura Policiaria. Fan life has been discovered in Japan and Greece and is reported in the Communist Empire. This doesn't count isolated people scattered from South Africa to the Formosa Straits who are, so to speak, expatriated members of other national fandoms.